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Electronic Stimulus

According to the Baltimore Sun, President Obama has promised to spend $50 billion dollars over the next five years coax hospitals, medical centers and the like to begin the process of offering electronic data.  So nurses, occupational therapist and other allied health personnel as well as Doctors may be carrying something like a Kindle around instead of a clip board.  With this comes an exstension of their existing regulatory framework such as HIPPA, CISP (as no one gets away from a visit to the Doctor without putting the plastic down these days) and future restrictions that will be put in place as a result of pressure from Libertarians and ACLU members. 

Ensuring that none of my personally identifiable information is left on someone’s screen while they walk away from their PC is a very big concern.  As these systems are brought online, ensuring that the data is protected, not so much from hackers, but also from basic behavioral mistakes that could result in someone leaning over a counter and getting my date of birth, social security number and credit card number.

While my security experience is very limited with HIPPA I can say that keeping this information hidden from the wrong eyes is a basic function of any security endeavor.  How vendors, System Integrators and IT personnel can best bridge this gap could have a direct correlation on how successful they are in this space.  How much of that $50 billion over five years will go to IBM? EDS/HP? Perot Systems?  What have you done to show these Systems Integrators as well as smaller partners how your product will help them meet this challenge and how will you deal with a security screw that seems to only get tightened?  Fact is, there are millions and millions of medical documents, and finding out which parts of which documents contain sensitive data is virtually impossible.  One solution is to pattern-match the data and block it so that it is not visible to the wrong people.  You could do this with a DBA who ran ad hoc queries to match the data and replace it with an “X” but then someone in billing may need that data (keep two copies?) not to mention the staggering cost (Y2K Part 2?).  The best way I can think of is to place the data behind a device that can capture the patters in the header and “X” the data out in real time.  Enter the Netscaler Platinum that will not only add compression, authentication, caching and business continuity, but will keep the wrong people from seeing the wrong data.  I am not sure when the money will start flowing but as I understand it, some hospitals having as much as $1.5 million dangled in front of them to meet this challenge.      

In this lab, I present how I used the Netscaler Platinum Application Firewall feature to secure personally identifiable data with a rule called “Safe Object” as well as how to deal with a zero day worm/virus using the “Deny URL” Rule.  This “Safe Object” feature, when coupled with the Netscaler policy engine, will allow you the flexibility to ensure that certain job types (Nurses, Doctors, etc) based on either login (setting authentication on the VIP) or subnet; do not see things like Social Security Numbers, Credit Cards and other sensitive data.  While at the same time, ensuring that information is available to billing and accounts receivable personnel. 

Materials:

For this lab, I used a basic Dell 1950 G6 with a virtualized Netscaler VPX that functioned as a VPN allowing me to establish a secure tunnel to the sensitive data on a non-wired network that resided on that server.  An Apache server on the non-wired network with bogus phone numbers and social security numbers was used as the back end web server.  Again, in a real world scenario, you could either hypervise your web server and place it on a non-wired network as covered in my “VPX Beyond the lab” blog or you could ACL off your web server so that only the MIP/SNIP of the Netscaler was allowed to access your web content. 

See the lab here:
http://citrix.utipu.com/app/tip/id/11733/

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